Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

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Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

Marta Garcia-Granero
This is a question I want to address to any spss-dot-com people who
might be checking the list.

Tomorrow (CET time) we have a meeting at the University of Navarra to
decide whether we keep on using SPSS/PASW or switch to a different
statistical package (Stata seems to be favored by some people). I am
right now gathering information from every participant (people who use
SPSS for teaching and research) about their grudges.

Main item is: everybody seems annoyed (very) by the policy of a new
version every year. We have to adapt our class notes, slides,
exercises... every year to the new version (since, many times, output
changes, screenshots of the program change too...). Some of them are not
only teachers, but busy researchers, and the time needed to modify the
teaching stuff is not easy to get. Some of them even said that if SPSS
15 can't be used for several more years, then they don't want the
program at all and will only use Stata (they are using it right now
along with SPSS 15).

Besides, computers used for teaching (500 is an underestimation of the
true number) are not brand new (rather old would be a better
description). Typical description of one of them, used for teaching
Office, SPSS, Procite...: 1 Gb RAM, 2 Ghz processor (no dual processors,
and let's not even mention quad processors), with Windows XP SP3. In
those computers, SPSS 15 runs quite well (although we are getting used
to interrupt the class briefly while some student has to recover from a
catastrophic error that closes suddenly SPSS 15, it happens up to 5
times in a 2 hours class, it can be irritating), but we tried PASW 17/18
and the results were awful: the program crawls, even with the simplest
t-test or ANOVA, because the hardware is well behind the software. Since
novice students don't benefit from the advantages of the new PASW
versions (Python, R, new syntax editor, programmability...), we are
wondering why we can't stick to SPSS 15 for at least 3-5 years, until
the turnover of the computers (to more powerful machines) is completed,
and new versions of PASW can be run without having to look at the screen
for a very long time until the output is finally delivered.

We don't need the newest PASW version on a brand new computer to teach
the fundamental of statistics to students, we'd rather have a reliable
(well, sort of) older version. Can we have that or should I surrender
tomorrow and say "all right people, let's use Stata"?.

Hoping I will not have to abandon my life long friend (my relation with
SPSS started with SPSS/PC+),
Marta García-Granero

--
For miscellaneous SPSS related statistical stuff, visit:
http://gjyp.nl/marta/

=====================
To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
[hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
command. To leave the list, send the command
SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command
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Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

Granaas, Michael
In prior years I only had new versions of SPSS installed in odd numbered versions--we just skipped even numbered update releases.  That worked quite well.

However, I don't know if that works with online/automated license checking.

Michael

****************************************************
Michael Granaas             [hidden email]
Assoc. Prof.                Phone: 605 677 5295
Dept. of Psychology         FAX:  605 677 3195
University of South Dakota
414 E. Clark St.
Vermillion, SD 57069
*****************************************************
________________________________________
From: SPSSX(r) Discussion [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Marta García-Granero [[hidden email]]
Sent: Wednesday, September 23, 2009 8:37 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

This is a question I want to address to any spss-dot-com people who
might be checking the list.

Tomorrow (CET time) we have a meeting at the University of Navarra to
decide whether we keep on using SPSS/PASW or switch to a different
statistical package (Stata seems to be favored by some people). I am
right now gathering information from every participant (people who use
SPSS for teaching and research) about their grudges.

Main item is: everybody seems annoyed (very) by the policy of a new
version every year. We have to adapt our class notes, slides,
exercises... every year to the new version (since, many times, output
changes, screenshots of the program change too...). Some of them are not
only teachers, but busy researchers, and the time needed to modify the
teaching stuff is not easy to get. Some of them even said that if SPSS
15 can't be used for several more years, then they don't want the
program at all and will only use Stata (they are using it right now
along with SPSS 15).

Besides, computers used for teaching (500 is an underestimation of the
true number) are not brand new (rather old would be a better
description). Typical description of one of them, used for teaching
Office, SPSS, Procite...: 1 Gb RAM, 2 Ghz processor (no dual processors,
and let's not even mention quad processors), with Windows XP SP3. In
those computers, SPSS 15 runs quite well (although we are getting used
to interrupt the class briefly while some student has to recover from a
catastrophic error that closes suddenly SPSS 15, it happens up to 5
times in a 2 hours class, it can be irritating), but we tried PASW 17/18
and the results were awful: the program crawls, even with the simplest
t-test or ANOVA, because the hardware is well behind the software. Since
novice students don't benefit from the advantages of the new PASW
versions (Python, R, new syntax editor, programmability...), we are
wondering why we can't stick to SPSS 15 for at least 3-5 years, until
the turnover of the computers (to more powerful machines) is completed,
and new versions of PASW can be run without having to look at the screen
for a very long time until the output is finally delivered.

We don't need the newest PASW version on a brand new computer to teach
the fundamental of statistics to students, we'd rather have a reliable
(well, sort of) older version. Can we have that or should I surrender
tomorrow and say "all right people, let's use Stata"?.

Hoping I will not have to abandon my life long friend (my relation with
SPSS started with SPSS/PC+),
Marta García-Granero

--
For miscellaneous SPSS related statistical stuff, visit:
http://gjyp.nl/marta/

=====================
To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
[hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
command. To leave the list, send the command
SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command
INFO REFCARD

=====================
To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
[hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
command. To leave the list, send the command
SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command
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Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

Sonia Brandon
In reply to this post by Marta Garcia-Granero
We concur.

We are currently using SPSS 15 - and actually reverted back after installing 16
and 17 because it was taking too long to get all of the kinks worked out.  With
state budget cuts, we share many of the concerns expressed by Marta.  We won't
upgrade to a version that is too much of a hassle to install, and we will go to
SAS or Stata if it becomes too much of an issue.

I also am a longtime user (SPSS mainframe), and use SPSS daily in my work, as
does my entire staff.  I do not want to go away from SPSS, but the issues
associated with a new version every year are not trivial.

Sonia Brandon, Ph.D.
Director, Institutional Research
Mesa State College
1100 North Avenue
Grand Junction, CO  81501
phone: (970) 248-1884
fax:  (970) 248-1812
email: [hidden email]

>>> Marta García-Granero <[hidden email]> 09/23/09 7:37 AM >>>
This is a question I want to address to any spss-dot-com people who
might be checking the list.

Tomorrow (CET time) we have a meeting at the University of Navarra to
decide whether we keep on using SPSS/PASW or switch to a different
statistical package (Stata seems to be favored by some people). I am
right now gathering information from every participant (people who use
SPSS for teaching and research) about their grudges.

Main item is: everybody seems annoyed (very) by the policy of a new
version every year. We have to adapt our class notes, slides,
exercises... every year to the new version (since, many times, output
changes, screenshots of the program change too...). Some of them are not
only teachers, but busy researchers, and the time needed to modify the
teaching stuff is not easy to get. Some of them even said that if SPSS
15 can't be used for several more years, then they don't want the
program at all and will only use Stata (they are using it right now
along with SPSS 15).

Besides, computers used for teaching (500 is an underestimation of the
true number) are not brand new (rather old would be a better
description). Typical description of one of them, used for teaching
Office, SPSS, Procite...: 1 Gb RAM, 2 Ghz processor (no dual processors,
and let's not even mention quad processors), with Windows XP SP3. In
those computers, SPSS 15 runs quite well (although we are getting used
to interrupt the class briefly while some student has to recover from a
catastrophic error that closes suddenly SPSS 15, it happens up to 5
times in a 2 hours class, it can be irritating), but we tried PASW 17/18
and the results were awful: the program crawls, even with the simplest
t-test or ANOVA, because the hardware is well behind the software. Since
novice students don't benefit from the advantages of the new PASW
versions (Python, R, new syntax editor, programmability...), we are
wondering why we can't stick to SPSS 15 for at least 3-5 years, until
the turnover of the computers (to more powerful machines) is completed,
and new versions of PASW can be run without having to look at the screen
for a very long time until the output is finally delivered.

We don't need the newest PASW version on a brand new computer to teach
the fundamental of statistics to students, we'd rather have a reliable
(well, sort of) older version. Can we have that or should I surrender
tomorrow and say "all right people, let's use Stata"?.

Hoping I will not have to abandon my life long friend (my relation with
SPSS started with SPSS/PC+),
Marta García-Granero

--
For miscellaneous SPSS related statistical stuff, visit:
http://gjyp.nl/marta/

=====================
To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
[hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
command. To leave the list, send the command
SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command
INFO REFCARD

=====================
To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
[hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
command. To leave the list, send the command
SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command
INFO REFCARD
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Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

Barnett, Adrian (DECD)
In reply to this post by Marta Garcia-Granero
Hi Marta
I wonder if you would be allowed by your local SPSS office to have new licence keys for V15 in view of the difficulties with the hardware available to your university? I can't see how you would be violating the spirit of your licence terms by doing this so I'd hope the local office would see reason and help you.

I have had to do the same thing, and my local office here were very helpful in allowing me to keep using 15 due to a problem I was having with a bug in 16 and 17 that stopped an important program of mine from working.

For the work I do, I have been grateful that SPSS have been making changes to the software that allow it to take advantage of greater RAM and multiple processors/cores. I tend to have to deal with really big data sets that have been challenging to run on even high end hardware (since the older software wasn't able to take proper advantage of it).

The teaching function is of course a different matter, with different constraints, as you point out.

Greater flexibility with licensing might be an answer, and failing this, maybe a 'Lite' version would help?

I think it would be very much in the interests of SPSS Inc to accommodate universities, as this is where their future customers will come from. Digital Equipment Corporation learned this lesson in the late 70s with the terms they offered universities for their VAX hardware, and it worked very well till the success it led to in the corporate area made them think they didn't need universities any more. Things went downhill pretty fast after that, although companies like Sun did pretty well in filling the vacuum.

Regards,



Adrian Barnett
Information Analyst
Educational Measurement and Analysis
Data Management
DECS
ph 82261080
-----Original Message-----
From: SPSSX(r) Discussion [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Marta García-Granero
Sent: Wednesday, 23 September 2009 11:07 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

This is a question I want to address to any spss-dot-com people who
might be checking the list.

Tomorrow (CET time) we have a meeting at the University of Navarra to
decide whether we keep on using SPSS/PASW or switch to a different
statistical package (Stata seems to be favored by some people). I am
right now gathering information from every participant (people who use
SPSS for teaching and research) about their grudges.

Main item is: everybody seems annoyed (very) by the policy of a new
version every year. We have to adapt our class notes, slides,
exercises... every year to the new version (since, many times, output
changes, screenshots of the program change too...). Some of them are not
only teachers, but busy researchers, and the time needed to modify the
teaching stuff is not easy to get. Some of them even said that if SPSS
15 can't be used for several more years, then they don't want the
program at all and will only use Stata (they are using it right now
along with SPSS 15).

Besides, computers used for teaching (500 is an underestimation of the
true number) are not brand new (rather old would be a better
description). Typical description of one of them, used for teaching
Office, SPSS, Procite...: 1 Gb RAM, 2 Ghz processor (no dual processors,
and let's not even mention quad processors), with Windows XP SP3. In
those computers, SPSS 15 runs quite well (although we are getting used
to interrupt the class briefly while some student has to recover from a
catastrophic error that closes suddenly SPSS 15, it happens up to 5
times in a 2 hours class, it can be irritating), but we tried PASW 17/18
and the results were awful: the program crawls, even with the simplest
t-test or ANOVA, because the hardware is well behind the software. Since
novice students don't benefit from the advantages of the new PASW
versions (Python, R, new syntax editor, programmability...), we are
wondering why we can't stick to SPSS 15 for at least 3-5 years, until
the turnover of the computers (to more powerful machines) is completed,
and new versions of PASW can be run without having to look at the screen
for a very long time until the output is finally delivered.

We don't need the newest PASW version on a brand new computer to teach
the fundamental of statistics to students, we'd rather have a reliable
(well, sort of) older version. Can we have that or should I surrender
tomorrow and say "all right people, let's use Stata"?.

Hoping I will not have to abandon my life long friend (my relation with
SPSS started with SPSS/PC+),
Marta García-Granero

--
For miscellaneous SPSS related statistical stuff, visit:
http://gjyp.nl/marta/

=====================
To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
[hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
command. To leave the list, send the command
SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command
INFO REFCARD

=====================
To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
[hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
command. To leave the list, send the command
SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command
INFO REFCARD
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Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

SR Millis-3
Perhaps a more a appropriate name for SPSS is PASWAHHH!!!  I hear the crying starting!!





--- On Wed, 9/23/09, Barnett, Adrian (DECS) <[hidden email]> wrote:

> From: Barnett, Adrian (DECS) <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?
> To: [hidden email]
> Date: Wednesday, September 23, 2009, 8:17 PM
> Hi Marta
> I wonder if you would be allowed by your local SPSS office
> to have new licence keys for V15 in view of the difficulties
> with the hardware available to your university? I can't see
> how you would be violating the spirit of your licence terms
> by doing this so I'd hope the local office would see reason
> and help you.
>
> I have had to do the same thing, and my local office here
> were very helpful in allowing me to keep using 15 due to a
> problem I was having with a bug in 16 and 17 that stopped an
> important program of mine from working.
>
> For the work I do, I have been grateful that SPSS have been
> making changes to the software that allow it to take
> advantage of greater RAM and multiple processors/cores. I
> tend to have to deal with really big data sets that have
> been challenging to run on even high end hardware (since the
> older software wasn't able to take proper advantage of it).
>
> The teaching function is of course a different matter, with
> different constraints, as you point out.
>
> Greater flexibility with licensing might be an answer, and
> failing this, maybe a 'Lite' version would help?
>
> I think it would be very much in the interests of SPSS Inc
> to accommodate universities, as this is where their future
> customers will come from. Digital Equipment Corporation
> learned this lesson in the late 70s with the terms they
> offered universities for their VAX hardware, and it worked
> very well till the success it led to in the corporate area
> made them think they didn't need universities any more.
> Things went downhill pretty fast after that, although
> companies like Sun did pretty well in filling the vacuum.
>
> Regards,
>
>
>
> Adrian Barnett
> Information Analyst
> Educational Measurement and Analysis
> Data Management
> DECS
> ph 82261080
> -----Original Message-----
> From: SPSSX(r) Discussion [mailto:[hidden email]]
> On Behalf Of Marta García-Granero
> Sent: Wednesday, 23 September 2009 11:07 PM
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?
>
> This is a question I want to address to any spss-dot-com
> people who
> might be checking the list.
>
> Tomorrow (CET time) we have a meeting at the University of
> Navarra to
> decide whether we keep on using SPSS/PASW or switch to a
> different
> statistical package (Stata seems to be favored by some
> people). I am
> right now gathering information from every participant
> (people who use
> SPSS for teaching and research) about their grudges.
>
> Main item is: everybody seems annoyed (very) by the policy
> of a new
> version every year. We have to adapt our class notes,
> slides,
> exercises... every year to the new version (since, many
> times, output
> changes, screenshots of the program change too...). Some of
> them are not
> only teachers, but busy researchers, and the time needed to
> modify the
> teaching stuff is not easy to get. Some of them even said
> that if SPSS
> 15 can't be used for several more years, then they don't
> want the
> program at all and will only use Stata (they are using it
> right now
> along with SPSS 15).
>
> Besides, computers used for teaching (500 is an
> underestimation of the
> true number) are not brand new (rather old would be a
> better
> description). Typical description of one of them, used for
> teaching
> Office, SPSS, Procite...: 1 Gb RAM, 2 Ghz processor (no
> dual processors,
> and let's not even mention quad processors), with Windows
> XP SP3. In
> those computers, SPSS 15 runs quite well (although we are
> getting used
> to interrupt the class briefly while some student has to
> recover from a
> catastrophic error that closes suddenly SPSS 15, it happens
> up to 5
> times in a 2 hours class, it can be irritating), but we
> tried PASW 17/18
> and the results were awful: the program crawls, even with
> the simplest
> t-test or ANOVA, because the hardware is well behind the
> software. Since
> novice students don't benefit from the advantages of the
> new PASW
> versions (Python, R, new syntax editor,
> programmability...), we are
> wondering why we can't stick to SPSS 15 for at least 3-5
> years, until
> the turnover of the computers (to more powerful machines)
> is completed,
> and new versions of PASW can be run without having to look
> at the screen
> for a very long time until the output is finally
> delivered.
>
> We don't need the newest PASW version on a brand new
> computer to teach
> the fundamental of statistics to students, we'd rather have
> a reliable
> (well, sort of) older version. Can we have that or should I
> surrender
> tomorrow and say "all right people, let's use Stata"?.
>
> Hoping I will not have to abandon my life long friend (my
> relation with
> SPSS started with SPSS/PC+),
> Marta García-Granero
>
> --
> For miscellaneous SPSS related statistical stuff, visit:
> http://gjyp.nl/marta/
>
> =====================
> To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
> [hidden email]
> (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
> command. To leave the list, send the command
> SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
> For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the
> command
> INFO REFCARD
>
> =====================
> To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
> [hidden email]
> (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
> command. To leave the list, send the command
> SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
> For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the
> command
> INFO REFCARD
>

=====================
To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
[hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
command. To leave the list, send the command
SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command
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Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

Graham Wright-2
In reply to this post by Barnett, Adrian (DECD)
I still use version 15 and I don't really have a choice. I'm using a 64
bit windows xp machine. SPSS has told me that after version 16 there is
no support for this configuration, so either I go back to 32 bits, or
upgrade to vista, neither of which seems worth it just to get the newest
version of SPSS (I could upgrade to 16, but it runs much slower than
15). My university has thankfully kept buying the 15 license (the new
one always comes through just at the nick of time) and I'm trying to
make sure they keep doing so, but I know this is unsustainable. My
research center started buying Stata a couple years ago and hopefully by
the time the university gets fed up with buying 4 SPSS site licenses
each year (15,16,17,18) we'll have totally transitioned over to Stata,
which we actually own, so we never have to worry about licensing. The
newest version of Stata MP also runs great on 64 bit XP and can take
advantage of multiple processes just fine. Since I physically can't use
the newer versions of SPSS, the whole question of upgrading is kind of
moot.

So yes, a "legacy" version of 15 would be greatly appreciated, probably
more by my university than me, since they're the ones paying for the
licenses.

-G

Barnett, Adrian (DECS) wrote:

> Hi Marta
> I wonder if you would be allowed by your local SPSS office to have new licence keys for V15 in view of the difficulties with the hardware available to your university? I can't see how you would be violating the spirit of your licence terms by doing this so I'd hope the local office would see reason and help you.
>
> I have had to do the same thing, and my local office here were very helpful in allowing me to keep using 15 due to a problem I was having with a bug in 16 and 17 that stopped an important program of mine from working.
>
> For the work I do, I have been grateful that SPSS have been making changes to the software that allow it to take advantage of greater RAM and multiple processors/cores. I tend to have to deal with really big data sets that have been challenging to run on even high end hardware (since the older software wasn't able to take proper advantage of it).
>
> The teaching function is of course a different matter, with different constraints, as you point out.
>
> Greater flexibility with licensing might be an answer, and failing this, maybe a 'Lite' version would help?
>
> I think it would be very much in the interests of SPSS Inc to accommodate universities, as this is where their future customers will come from. Digital Equipment Corporation learned this lesson in the late 70s with the terms they offered universities for their VAX hardware, and it worked very well till the success it led to in the corporate area made them think they didn't need universities any more. Things went downhill pretty fast after that, although companies like Sun did pretty well in filling the vacuum.
>
> Regards,
>
>
>
> Adrian Barnett
> Information Analyst
> Educational Measurement and Analysis
> Data Management
> DECS
> ph 82261080
> -----Original Message-----
> From: SPSSX(r) Discussion [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Marta García-Granero
> Sent: Wednesday, 23 September 2009 11:07 PM
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?
>
> This is a question I want to address to any spss-dot-com people who
> might be checking the list.
>
> Tomorrow (CET time) we have a meeting at the University of Navarra to
> decide whether we keep on using SPSS/PASW or switch to a different
> statistical package (Stata seems to be favored by some people). I am
> right now gathering information from every participant (people who use
> SPSS for teaching and research) about their grudges.
>
> Main item is: everybody seems annoyed (very) by the policy of a new
> version every year. We have to adapt our class notes, slides,
> exercises... every year to the new version (since, many times, output
> changes, screenshots of the program change too...). Some of them are not
> only teachers, but busy researchers, and the time needed to modify the
> teaching stuff is not easy to get. Some of them even said that if SPSS
> 15 can't be used for several more years, then they don't want the
> program at all and will only use Stata (they are using it right now
> along with SPSS 15).
>
> Besides, computers used for teaching (500 is an underestimation of the
> true number) are not brand new (rather old would be a better
> description). Typical description of one of them, used for teaching
> Office, SPSS, Procite...: 1 Gb RAM, 2 Ghz processor (no dual processors,
> and let's not even mention quad processors), with Windows XP SP3. In
> those computers, SPSS 15 runs quite well (although we are getting used
> to interrupt the class briefly while some student has to recover from a
> catastrophic error that closes suddenly SPSS 15, it happens up to 5
> times in a 2 hours class, it can be irritating), but we tried PASW 17/18
> and the results were awful: the program crawls, even with the simplest
> t-test or ANOVA, because the hardware is well behind the software. Since
> novice students don't benefit from the advantages of the new PASW
> versions (Python, R, new syntax editor, programmability...), we are
> wondering why we can't stick to SPSS 15 for at least 3-5 years, until
> the turnover of the computers (to more powerful machines) is completed,
> and new versions of PASW can be run without having to look at the screen
> for a very long time until the output is finally delivered.
>
> We don't need the newest PASW version on a brand new computer to teach
> the fundamental of statistics to students, we'd rather have a reliable
> (well, sort of) older version. Can we have that or should I surrender
> tomorrow and say "all right people, let's use Stata"?.
>
> Hoping I will not have to abandon my life long friend (my relation with
> SPSS started with SPSS/PC+),
> Marta García-Granero
>
> --
> For miscellaneous SPSS related statistical stuff, visit:
> http://gjyp.nl/marta/
>
> =====================
> To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
> [hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
> command. To leave the list, send the command
> SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
> For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command
> INFO REFCARD
>
> =====================
> To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
> [hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
> command. To leave the list, send the command
> SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
> For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command
> INFO REFCARD
>

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Compute

Kemal Suher
I want to find the most repeated value in the row and I want to use Compute
menu. But I can not find the right function. I have six variables. I want to
create a new variable and I want spss to find and write the most repated
value for every row from six variables. Compute admits mode but for only two
variables. If you cam help me I will be very pleased.

Kemal

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Re: Compute

Ruben Geert van den Berg
Dear Kemal,
 
"Compute admits mode but for only two variables."
 
Are you sure you're not confused with the modulus function here?
 
The syntax below, however, works to some extent. It doesn't handle ties, however. So if my responses are
1 1 2 3 4 4
then both '1' and '4' occur twice and 2 and 3 once. So my distribution is actually bimodal. I'm not sure how to overcome this problem.
 
*Create fake data, assuming 6 variables are 5-point scales.
 
data lis free/id.
begin data
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
end data.
do rep vars=v1 to v6.
comp vars=rnd(rv.uni(1,5)).
end rep.
exe.
 
*End create fake data.
*Mod = within-case modus.
 
comp mod=0.
do rep temp=#temp1 to #temp5/num=1 to 5.
count temp=v1 to v6(num).
do if temp gt mod.
comp mod=num.
end if.
exe.
end rep.
exe.
 




 



 

> Date: Thu, 24 Sep 2009 16:43:04 +0300
> From: [hidden email]
> Subject: Compute
> To: [hidden email]
>
> I want to find the most repeated value in the row and I want to use Compute
> menu. But I can not find the right function. I have six variables. I want to
> create a new variable and I want spss to find and write the most repated
> value for every row from six variables. Compute admits mode but for only two
> variables. If you cam help me I will be very pleased.
>
> Kemal
>
> =====================
> To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
> [hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
> command. To leave the list, send the command
> SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
> For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command
> INFO REFCARD


What can you do with the new Windows Live? Find out
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Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

Bruce Weaver
Administrator
In reply to this post by Marta Garcia-Granero
When I was at McMaster University, I purchased a copy of Stata 8 (intercooled version) for about $190 Canadian.  That was the price at the time under the GradPlan, and it got me a permanent license for the entire program (i.e., it is not modular).  There is a fee for upgrades to subsequent versions, of course.  I never did upgrade to v9, but now have v10.  Thus far, I have only used it for things that would have required some kludgy work-around in SPSS, if they were possible at all.  At times I have considered making the switch, but there are 3 main reasons why I have not done so yet:

1) It is the package that is available to students in computer labs, and so is the one that is used for the course I teach;

2) Virtually all of my colleagues use SPSS, and part of my role is to support them.  

3) I would be throwing away a lot of implicit knowledge that I have acquired over the years using SPSS.

But if Stata were to make a big push to get their product into the universities at competitive prices, the first two reasons would largely go away.  And frankly, I don't understand why they have not made a bigger push to get in and compete with SPSS.

Comparisons of various packages come up occasionally in newsgroups, of course.  Here is a good post by Alan Acock with some comments on SPSS v Stata.  It's a bit dated, but still interesting, I think.

  http://groups.google.ca/group/sci.stat.edu/msg/61863d16af69584d?dmode=source&hl=en

Cheers,
Bruce


Marta García-Granero-3 wrote
This is a question I want to address to any spss-dot-com people who
might be checking the list.

Tomorrow (CET time) we have a meeting at the University of Navarra to
decide whether we keep on using SPSS/PASW or switch to a different
statistical package (Stata seems to be favored by some people). I am
right now gathering information from every participant (people who use
SPSS for teaching and research) about their grudges.

Main item is: everybody seems annoyed (very) by the policy of a new
version every year. We have to adapt our class notes, slides,
exercises... every year to the new version (since, many times, output
changes, screenshots of the program change too...). Some of them are not
only teachers, but busy researchers, and the time needed to modify the
teaching stuff is not easy to get. Some of them even said that if SPSS
15 can't be used for several more years, then they don't want the
program at all and will only use Stata (they are using it right now
along with SPSS 15).

Besides, computers used for teaching (500 is an underestimation of the
true number) are not brand new (rather old would be a better
description). Typical description of one of them, used for teaching
Office, SPSS, Procite...: 1 Gb RAM, 2 Ghz processor (no dual processors,
and let's not even mention quad processors), with Windows XP SP3. In
those computers, SPSS 15 runs quite well (although we are getting used
to interrupt the class briefly while some student has to recover from a
catastrophic error that closes suddenly SPSS 15, it happens up to 5
times in a 2 hours class, it can be irritating), but we tried PASW 17/18
and the results were awful: the program crawls, even with the simplest
t-test or ANOVA, because the hardware is well behind the software. Since
novice students don't benefit from the advantages of the new PASW
versions (Python, R, new syntax editor, programmability...), we are
wondering why we can't stick to SPSS 15 for at least 3-5 years, until
the turnover of the computers (to more powerful machines) is completed,
and new versions of PASW can be run without having to look at the screen
for a very long time until the output is finally delivered.

We don't need the newest PASW version on a brand new computer to teach
the fundamental of statistics to students, we'd rather have a reliable
(well, sort of) older version. Can we have that or should I surrender
tomorrow and say "all right people, let's use Stata"?.

Hoping I will not have to abandon my life long friend (my relation with
SPSS started with SPSS/PC+),
Marta García-Granero

--
For miscellaneous SPSS related statistical stuff, visit:
http://gjyp.nl/marta/

=====================
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--
Bruce Weaver
bweaver@lakeheadu.ca
http://sites.google.com/a/lakeheadu.ca/bweaver/

"When all else fails, RTFM."

NOTE: My Hotmail account is not monitored regularly.
To send me an e-mail, please use the address shown above.
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Re: Compute

Albert-Jan Roskam
In reply to this post by Kemal Suher
Hi,

Did you already consider how you deal with ties? For example, value 3 and 4 each occur 3 times. Which is the most repeated value?

I would loop over the data and create a Python dictionary 'd' for each case, with values and frequencies as keys and values, respectively. The most often repeated value of a record is then defined as rep_value = d.get(max(d)). But with ties rep_value equals just any one of the ties.

Something like that. But I'm not sure how to use one (and only one, because of my Spss version [15 here at home] doesn't allow me to use more) cursor for both reading and writing case data.

Cheers!!
Albert-Jan


--- On Thu, 9/24/09, Kemal Suher <[hidden email]> wrote:

> From: Kemal Suher <[hidden email]>
> Subject: [SPSSX-L] Compute
> To: [hidden email]
> Date: Thursday, September 24, 2009, 3:43 PM
> I want to find the most repeated
> value in the row and I want to use Compute
> menu. But I can not find the right function. I have six
> variables. I want to
> create a new variable and I want spss to find and write the
> most repated
> value for every row from six variables. Compute admits mode
> but for only two
> variables. If you cam help me I will be very pleased.
>
> Kemal
>
> =====================
> To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
> [hidden email]
> (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
> command. To leave the list, send the command
> SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
> For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the
> command
> INFO REFCARD
>

=====================
To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
[hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
command. To leave the list, send the command
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For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command
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Re: Compute

Peck, Jon
If you mean that you want the within-case mode, there are two functions in the extendedTransforms module that can be used with the SPSSINC TRANS extension command to calculate a casewise mode.  They work with V17 or later and the programmability plugin.

Here's an example.
SPSSINC TRANS RESULT=themode modecount
/FORMULA extendedTransforms.mode(x1, x2, ..., x6)

That creates TWO variables: themode is a mode, picking arbitrarily if there is a tie, and modecount is the number of modes.

The second function is multimode.  It could be used like this:
SPSSINC TRANS RESULT=themode1 themode2
/FORMULA extendedTransforms.multimode(args=[x1, x2, ..., x6], maxvalues=2).

That returns up to two mode values in variables themode1 and themode2 (sysmis in themode2 if the mode is unique).

multimode also provides control over whether or not to include missing values in the calculation.

The plugin and these supplementary modules are available from Developer Central (www.spss.com/devcentral).

HTH,
Jon Peck



-----Original Message-----
From: SPSSX(r) Discussion [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Albert-Jan Roskam
Sent: Thursday, September 24, 2009 12:52 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [SPSSX-L] Compute

Hi,

Did you already consider how you deal with ties? For example, value 3 and 4 each occur 3 times. Which is the most repeated value?

I would loop over the data and create a Python dictionary 'd' for each case, with values and frequencies as keys and values, respectively. The most often repeated value of a record is then defined as rep_value = d.get(max(d)). But with ties rep_value equals just any one of the ties.

Something like that. But I'm not sure how to use one (and only one, because of my Spss version [15 here at home] doesn't allow me to use more) cursor for both reading and writing case data.

Cheers!!
Albert-Jan


--- On Thu, 9/24/09, Kemal Suher <[hidden email]> wrote:

> From: Kemal Suher <[hidden email]>
> Subject: [SPSSX-L] Compute
> To: [hidden email]
> Date: Thursday, September 24, 2009, 3:43 PM
> I want to find the most repeated
> value in the row and I want to use Compute
> menu. But I can not find the right function. I have six
> variables. I want to
> create a new variable and I want spss to find and write the
> most repated
> value for every row from six variables. Compute admits mode
> but for only two
> variables. If you cam help me I will be very pleased.
>
> Kemal
>
> =====================
> To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
> [hidden email]
> (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
> command. To leave the list, send the command
> SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
> For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the
> command
> INFO REFCARD
>

=====================
To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
[hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
command. To leave the list, send the command
SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command
INFO REFCARD

=====================
To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
[hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
command. To leave the list, send the command
SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command
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Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

Garry Gelade
In reply to this post by Bruce Weaver
Bruce

One of the great advantages of Stata is the ease with which new statistical
procedures can be added, eg if you want a robust statistics module, or a
spatial autocorrelation module, you can just download the relevant package
for free, and install it quickly. You don't have to 'upgrade'. SPSS on the
other hand comes with a fixed set of procedures. Of course you can add on
modules - at a price - but even then the range on offer is nowhere near as
comprehensive as in Stata.

That said, SPSS is a fantastic product in many ways, and its output
capabilities are far better than Stata. But instead of spending development
effort on annual upgrades, which are expensive and time consuming for many
users, I'd like to see SPSS extending the Python and R side, and building a
range of downloadable packages.

Garry Gelade
Business Analytic Ltd

-----Original Message-----
From: SPSSX(r) Discussion [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of
Bruce Weaver
Sent: 24 September 2009 19:26
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

When I was at McMaster University, I purchased a copy of Stata 8
(intercooled
version) for about $190 Canadian.  That was the price at the time under the
GradPlan, and it got me a permanent license for the entire program (i.e., it
is not modular).  There is a fee for upgrades to subsequent versions, of
course.  I never did upgrade to v9, but now have v10.  Thus far, I have only
used it for things that would have required some kludgy work-around in SPSS,
if they were possible at all.  At times I have considered making the switch,
but there are 3 main reasons why I have not done so yet:

1) It is the package that is available to students in computer labs, and so
is the one that is used for the course I teach;

2) Virtually all of my colleagues use SPSS, and part of my role is to
support them.

3) I would be throwing away a lot of implicit knowledge that I have acquired
over the years using SPSS.

But if Stata were to make a big push to get their product into the
universities at competitive prices, the first two reasons would largely go
away.  And frankly, I don't understand why they have not made a bigger push
to get in and compete with SPSS.

Comparisons of various packages come up occasionally in newsgroups, of
course.  Here is a good post by Alan Acock with some comments on SPSS v
Stata.  It's a bit dated, but still interesting, I think.


http://groups.google.ca/group/sci.stat.edu/msg/61863d16af69584d?dmode=source
&hl=en

Cheers,
Bruce



Marta García-Granero-3 wrote:

>
> This is a question I want to address to any spss-dot-com people who
> might be checking the list.
>
> Tomorrow (CET time) we have a meeting at the University of Navarra to
> decide whether we keep on using SPSS/PASW or switch to a different
> statistical package (Stata seems to be favored by some people). I am
> right now gathering information from every participant (people who use
> SPSS for teaching and research) about their grudges.
>
> Main item is: everybody seems annoyed (very) by the policy of a new
> version every year. We have to adapt our class notes, slides,
> exercises... every year to the new version (since, many times, output
> changes, screenshots of the program change too...). Some of them are
> not only teachers, but busy researchers, and the time needed to modify
> the teaching stuff is not easy to get. Some of them even said that if
> SPSS
> 15 can't be used for several more years, then they don't want the
> program at all and will only use Stata (they are using it right now
> along with SPSS 15).
>
> Besides, computers used for teaching (500 is an underestimation of the
> true number) are not brand new (rather old would be a better
> description). Typical description of one of them, used for teaching
> Office, SPSS, Procite...: 1 Gb RAM, 2 Ghz processor (no dual
> processors, and let's not even mention quad processors), with Windows
> XP SP3. In those computers, SPSS 15 runs quite well (although we are
> getting used to interrupt the class briefly while some student has to
> recover from a catastrophic error that closes suddenly SPSS 15, it
> happens up to 5 times in a 2 hours class, it can be irritating), but
> we tried PASW 17/18 and the results were awful: the program crawls,
> even with the simplest t-test or ANOVA, because the hardware is well
> behind the software. Since novice students don't benefit from the
> advantages of the new PASW versions (Python, R, new syntax editor,
> programmability...), we are wondering why we can't stick to SPSS 15
> for at least 3-5 years, until the turnover of the computers (to more
> powerful machines) is completed, and new versions of PASW can be run
> without having to look at the screen for a very long time until the output
is finally delivered.

>
> We don't need the newest PASW version on a brand new computer to teach
> the fundamental of statistics to students, we'd rather have a reliable
> (well, sort of) older version. Can we have that or should I surrender
> tomorrow and say "all right people, let's use Stata"?.
>
> Hoping I will not have to abandon my life long friend (my relation
> with SPSS started with SPSS/PC+), Marta García-Granero
>
> --
> For miscellaneous SPSS related statistical stuff, visit:
> http://gjyp.nl/marta/
>
> =====================
> To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
> [hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except
> the command. To leave the list, send the command SIGNOFF SPSSX-L For a
> list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command INFO
> REFCARD
>
>


-----
--
Bruce Weaver
[hidden email]
http://sites.google.com/a/lakeheadu.ca/bweaver/
"When all else fails, RTFM."

NOTE:  My Hotmail account is not monitored regularly.
To send me an e-mail, please use the address shown above.
--
View this message in context:
http://www.nabble.com/Can-we-%22freeze%22-at-SPSS-15-for-several-years--tp25
577413p25578035.html
Sent from the SPSSX Discussion mailing list archive at Nabble.com.

=====================
To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
[hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
command. To leave the list, send the command SIGNOFF SPSSX-L For a list of
commands to manage subscriptions, send the command INFO REFCARD

__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature
database 4455 (20090924) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com




__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature
database 4455 (20090924) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com

=====================
To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
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For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command
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Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

Peck, Jon
Currently there are 27 Python- or R-based extension commands downloadable - for free - from Developer Central, most including dialog box interfaces, plus some other packages that are not extension commands but have a dialog box interface.

I expect that we will create more of these, and users are invited to contribute their efforts.  Doc for how to do all this is on Developer Central (www.spss.com) supplementing the api documentation that is installed with the plugins.

And don't forget the new low-cost PASW Statistics Developer product that gives you the tools and infrastructure to roll your own statistical modules.  It includes all the traditional data management and graphical capabilities of the Base product as well as a number of R-based statistical procedures.

Regards,
Jon Peck

-----Original Message-----
From: SPSSX(r) Discussion [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Garry Gelade
Sent: Thursday, September 24, 2009 1:23 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [SPSSX-L] Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

Bruce

One of the great advantages of Stata is the ease with which new statistical
procedures can be added, eg if you want a robust statistics module, or a
spatial autocorrelation module, you can just download the relevant package
for free, and install it quickly. You don't have to 'upgrade'. SPSS on the
other hand comes with a fixed set of procedures. Of course you can add on
modules - at a price - but even then the range on offer is nowhere near as
comprehensive as in Stata.

That said, SPSS is a fantastic product in many ways, and its output
capabilities are far better than Stata. But instead of spending development
effort on annual upgrades, which are expensive and time consuming for many
users, I'd like to see SPSS extending the Python and R side, and building a
range of downloadable packages.

Garry Gelade
Business Analytic Ltd

-----Original Message-----
From: SPSSX(r) Discussion [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of
Bruce Weaver
Sent: 24 September 2009 19:26
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

When I was at McMaster University, I purchased a copy of Stata 8
(intercooled
version) for about $190 Canadian.  That was the price at the time under the
GradPlan, and it got me a permanent license for the entire program (i.e., it
is not modular).  There is a fee for upgrades to subsequent versions, of
course.  I never did upgrade to v9, but now have v10.  Thus far, I have only
used it for things that would have required some kludgy work-around in SPSS,
if they were possible at all.  At times I have considered making the switch,
but there are 3 main reasons why I have not done so yet:

1) It is the package that is available to students in computer labs, and so
is the one that is used for the course I teach;

2) Virtually all of my colleagues use SPSS, and part of my role is to
support them.

3) I would be throwing away a lot of implicit knowledge that I have acquired
over the years using SPSS.

But if Stata were to make a big push to get their product into the
universities at competitive prices, the first two reasons would largely go
away.  And frankly, I don't understand why they have not made a bigger push
to get in and compete with SPSS.

Comparisons of various packages come up occasionally in newsgroups, of
course.  Here is a good post by Alan Acock with some comments on SPSS v
Stata.  It's a bit dated, but still interesting, I think.


http://groups.google.ca/group/sci.stat.edu/msg/61863d16af69584d?dmode=source
&hl=en

Cheers,
Bruce



Marta García-Granero-3 wrote:

>
> This is a question I want to address to any spss-dot-com people who
> might be checking the list.
>
> Tomorrow (CET time) we have a meeting at the University of Navarra to
> decide whether we keep on using SPSS/PASW or switch to a different
> statistical package (Stata seems to be favored by some people). I am
> right now gathering information from every participant (people who use
> SPSS for teaching and research) about their grudges.
>
> Main item is: everybody seems annoyed (very) by the policy of a new
> version every year. We have to adapt our class notes, slides,
> exercises... every year to the new version (since, many times, output
> changes, screenshots of the program change too...). Some of them are
> not only teachers, but busy researchers, and the time needed to modify
> the teaching stuff is not easy to get. Some of them even said that if
> SPSS
> 15 can't be used for several more years, then they don't want the
> program at all and will only use Stata (they are using it right now
> along with SPSS 15).
>
> Besides, computers used for teaching (500 is an underestimation of the
> true number) are not brand new (rather old would be a better
> description). Typical description of one of them, used for teaching
> Office, SPSS, Procite...: 1 Gb RAM, 2 Ghz processor (no dual
> processors, and let's not even mention quad processors), with Windows
> XP SP3. In those computers, SPSS 15 runs quite well (although we are
> getting used to interrupt the class briefly while some student has to
> recover from a catastrophic error that closes suddenly SPSS 15, it
> happens up to 5 times in a 2 hours class, it can be irritating), but
> we tried PASW 17/18 and the results were awful: the program crawls,
> even with the simplest t-test or ANOVA, because the hardware is well
> behind the software. Since novice students don't benefit from the
> advantages of the new PASW versions (Python, R, new syntax editor,
> programmability...), we are wondering why we can't stick to SPSS 15
> for at least 3-5 years, until the turnover of the computers (to more
> powerful machines) is completed, and new versions of PASW can be run
> without having to look at the screen for a very long time until the output
is finally delivered.

>
> We don't need the newest PASW version on a brand new computer to teach
> the fundamental of statistics to students, we'd rather have a reliable
> (well, sort of) older version. Can we have that or should I surrender
> tomorrow and say "all right people, let's use Stata"?.
>
> Hoping I will not have to abandon my life long friend (my relation
> with SPSS started with SPSS/PC+), Marta García-Granero
>
> --
> For miscellaneous SPSS related statistical stuff, visit:
> http://gjyp.nl/marta/
>
> =====================
> To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
> [hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except
> the command. To leave the list, send the command SIGNOFF SPSSX-L For a
> list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command INFO
> REFCARD
>
>


-----
--
Bruce Weaver
[hidden email]
http://sites.google.com/a/lakeheadu.ca/bweaver/
"When all else fails, RTFM."

NOTE:  My Hotmail account is not monitored regularly.
To send me an e-mail, please use the address shown above.
--
View this message in context:
http://www.nabble.com/Can-we-%22freeze%22-at-SPSS-15-for-several-years--tp25
577413p25578035.html
Sent from the SPSSX Discussion mailing list archive at Nabble.com.

=====================
To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
[hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
command. To leave the list, send the command SIGNOFF SPSSX-L For a list of
commands to manage subscriptions, send the command INFO REFCARD

__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature
database 4455 (20090924) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com




__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature
database 4455 (20090924) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com

=====================
To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
[hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
command. To leave the list, send the command
SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command
INFO REFCARD

=====================
To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
[hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
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Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

John F Hall
In reply to this post by Garry Gelade
If  SPSS syntax is:
 
recode         V363 (1 3 5 7 =1)(2 4 6 8 =2) into ethnic.
rename variables (v348 = sex).
count             sexism =    V248 V252 V253 V256 V261 (3,4) 

                                         V251 V255 V259 V260 (1,2).

freq     sex ethnic.
freq     sexism /his nor.
cros     sexism by sex ethnic
            /sexism by sex by ethnic /cel per.
means sexism by sex ethnic
            /sexism by sex by ethnic.
 
...what would the syntax be in STATA and would it be as easy to understand?
 
 
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Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

Nils Braakmann
I don't get the complete SPSS-synta, but I try my best.
> recode         V363 (1 3 5 7 =1)(2 4 6 8 =2) into ethnic.
One possibility:
recode  V363 (1 3 5 7 =1)(2 4 6 8 =2)
ren V363 ethnic

> rename variables (v348 = sex).
ren V348 sex

> freq     sex ethnic.
tab sex ethnic (maybe with some suboptions, depending on what you want
in each cell)

In fact, I don't think there's much of a difference between SPSS and
Stata for these simple commands. The main advantage of the
Stata-syntax is that it always follows the structure "command
variables, options" which makes it pretty intuitive. For instance,

Linear regression
reg y x

with robust standard errors
reg y x, robust

with bootstrapped SEs (500 reps)
reg y x, vce(bootstrap, reps(500))

Logit
logit y x

with robust standard errors
logit y x, robust

And so on.

Best,

Nils
On Thu, Sep 24, 2009 at 10:58 PM, John F Hall <[hidden email]> wrote:

> If  SPSS syntax is:
>
> recode         V363 (1 3 5 7 =1)(2 4 6 8 =2) into ethnic.
> rename variables (v348 = sex).
> count             sexism =    V248 V252 V253 V256 V261 (3,4)
>
>                                          V251 V255 V259 V260 (1,2).
>
> freq     sex ethnic.
> freq     sexism /his nor.
> cros     sexism by sex ethnic
>             /sexism by sex by ethnic /cel per.
> means sexism by sex ethnic
>             /sexism by sex by ethnic.
>
> ...what would the syntax be in STATA and would it be as easy to understand?
>
>

=====================
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Re: Compute

Albert-Jan Roskam
In reply to this post by Peck, Jon
Hi Jon and others,

Below is my solution, but it gets quite low-tech at the cursor part. The thing is (using v15), I know how to READ and how to WRITE case data, but not how to do both in one cursor 'session'. Is there an accesstype="rw"? Or is that post-v15 altogether?

What would be the best, most efficient, most Pythonic way to accomplish this?

Thank you in advance and enjoy your weekend!

Albert-Jan

import spss, spssdata

# sample data
spss.Submit(r"""
data list free / x (f) y (f) z (f).
begin data
1 1 1
1 2 3
1 1 0
0 9 5
end data.
save outfile = 'd:/temp/tmp0.sav'.
""")

# create a "frequency table" for each case
# Note. Python 2.5 would offer a much juicier solution with collections.defaultdict() ;-)
def update_freqs(record):
    freqs = {}
    for key in record:
        if key not in freqs:
            freqs.setdefault(key, 1)
        else:
            freqs.update({key: freqs.get(key) + 1})
    maxkey = max(freqs.keys())
    maxval = max(freqs.values())
    return {maxkey: maxval}

# store the frequency table in a potentially huge dictionary named casenum
spss.Submit("get file = 'd:/temp/tmp0.sav'.")
data = spssdata.Spssdata(["x", "y", "z" ])
casenum = {}
for lino, record in enumerate(data):
    f = update_freqs(record)
    print f
    casenum.update({lino+1: f})

data.CClose()

# warning: a very low-tech solution follows! ;-)
# apply a potentially huge amount of IF statements
# nicer would be: read case data with one cursor, then instantly commit case data with another,
# without building this dictionary.

for lino, kv in casenum.iteritems():
    spss.Submit(r"""
do if ( $casenum eq %s ).
+compute maxkey = %s.
+compute maxval = %s.
end if.
list all.
    """ % (lino, kv.keys()[0], kv.values()[0]))



--- On Thu, 9/24/09, Peck, Jon <[hidden email]> wrote:

> From: Peck, Jon <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: [SPSSX-L] Compute
> To: [hidden email]
> Date: Thursday, September 24, 2009, 9:05 PM
> If you mean that you want the
> within-case mode, there are two functions in the
> extendedTransforms module that can be used with the SPSSINC
> TRANS extension command to calculate a casewise mode.
> They work with V17 or later and the programmability plugin.
>
> Here's an example.
> SPSSINC TRANS RESULT=themode modecount
> /FORMULA extendedTransforms.mode(x1, x2, ..., x6)
>
> That creates TWO variables: themode is a mode, picking
> arbitrarily if there is a tie, and modecount is the number
> of modes.
>
> The second function is multimode.  It could be used
> like this:
> SPSSINC TRANS RESULT=themode1 themode2
> /FORMULA extendedTransforms.multimode(args=[x1, x2, ...,
> x6], maxvalues=2).
>
> That returns up to two mode values in variables themode1
> and themode2 (sysmis in themode2 if the mode is unique).
>
> multimode also provides control over whether or not to
> include missing values in the calculation.
>
> The plugin and these supplementary modules are available
> from Developer Central (www.spss.com/devcentral).
>
> HTH,
> Jon Peck
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: SPSSX(r) Discussion [mailto:[hidden email]]
> On Behalf Of Albert-Jan Roskam
> Sent: Thursday, September 24, 2009 12:52 PM
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [SPSSX-L] Compute
>
> Hi,
>
> Did you already consider how you deal with ties? For
> example, value 3 and 4 each occur 3 times. Which is the most
> repeated value?
>
> I would loop over the data and create a Python dictionary
> 'd' for each case, with values and frequencies as keys and
> values, respectively. The most often repeated value of a
> record is then defined as rep_value = d.get(max(d)). But
> with ties rep_value equals just any one of the ties.
>
> Something like that. But I'm not sure how to use one (and
> only one, because of my Spss version [15 here at home]
> doesn't allow me to use more) cursor for both reading and
> writing case data.
>
> Cheers!!
> Albert-Jan
>
>
> --- On Thu, 9/24/09, Kemal Suher <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
> > From: Kemal Suher <[hidden email]>
> > Subject: [SPSSX-L] Compute
> > To: [hidden email]
> > Date: Thursday, September 24, 2009, 3:43 PM
> > I want to find the most repeated
> > value in the row and I want to use Compute
> > menu. But I can not find the right function. I have
> six
> > variables. I want to
> > create a new variable and I want spss to find and
> write the
> > most repated
> > value for every row from six variables. Compute admits
> mode
> > but for only two
> > variables. If you cam help me I will be very pleased.
> >
> > Kemal
> >
> > =====================
> > To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message
> to
> > [hidden email]
> > (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
> > command. To leave the list, send the command
> > SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
> > For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send
> the
> > command
> > INFO REFCARD
> >
>
> =====================
> To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
> [hidden email]
> (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
> command. To leave the list, send the command
> SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
> For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the
> command
> INFO REFCARD
>
> =====================
> To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
> [hidden email]
> (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
> command. To leave the list, send the command
> SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
> For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the
> command
> INFO REFCARD
>

=====================
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Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

John F Hall
In reply to this post by Nils Braakmann
Looks fairly intuitive.  Can it really do everything I want?  If so, does this mean I have to ditch 38 years of SPSS?
 
My tutorials are built round the processing and analysis of actual data from real questionnaire surveys (no artificial data whatsoever) from initial checking of raw data to publishable tables and charts.  I use SPSS because it was there when everyone needed it, was widely available and had a manual which made sense (even though I had to write tutorials to suit the research sequence rather than follow the alphetical sequence of commands). 
 
I'm too busy doing my SPSS versions, but it would be interesting to see parallel STATA syntax alongside that for SPSS.  More than 30 years ago, Steve Tagg and I thought of producing a Clods' Guide to Survey Analysis with SPSS, but we later also had the idea of a loose-leaf edition with side-by-side examples from other software.  I don't know if anyone has actually produced such a manual, but if anyone wants to try it with any of my tutorials, feel free.
 
They're all listed on  Survey Analysis Workshop (July 2009) with hyperlinks for free downloads.  By the end of today there'll be even more uploads.
 
This thread is throwing up some really interesting comments, but I'm not sure the subject is catching everyone who could contribute.  Perhaps something like, "SPSS versus other software"?
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, September 25, 2009 11:00 AM
Subject: Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?


I don't get the complete SPSS-synta, but I try my best.
> recode         V363 (1 3 5 7 =1)(2 4 6 8 =2) into ethnic.
One possibility:
recode  V363 (1 3 5 7 =1)(2 4 6 8 =2)
ren V363 ethnic

> rename variables (v348 = sex).
ren V348 sex

> freq     sex ethnic.
tab sex ethnic (maybe with some suboptions, depending on what you want
in each cell)

In fact, I don't think there's much of a difference between SPSS and
Stata for these simple commands. The main advantage of the
Stata-syntax is that it always follows the structure "command
variables, options" which makes it pretty intuitive. For instance,

Linear regression
reg y x

with robust standard errors
reg y x, robust

with bootstrapped SEs (500 reps)
reg y x, vce(bootstrap, reps(500))

Logit
logit y x

with robust standard errors
logit y x, robust

And so on.

Best,

Nils
On Thu, Sep 24, 2009 at 10:58 PM, John F Hall <[hidden email]> wrote:

> If SPSS syntax is:
>
> recode V363 (1 3 5 7 =1)(2 4 6 8 =2) into ethnic.
> rename variables (v348 = sex).
> count sexism = V248 V252 V253 V256 V261 (3,4)
>
> V251 V255 V259 V260 (1,2).
>
> freq sex ethnic.
> freq sexism /his nor.
> cros sexism by sex ethnic
> /sexism by sex by ethnic /cel per.
> means sexism by sex ethnic
> /sexism by sex by ethnic.
>
> ...what would the syntax be in STATA and would it be as easy to understand?
>
>

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Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

Mike
If one wants "SPSS versus other software" one should look at the Tabachnick & Fidel
"Using Multivariate Statistics" which is presently in the 5th edition.  Available on
Amazon and other booksellers, I suggest  looking at the 4th edition which compares
how SAS, SPSS, and SYSTAT (remember that?) compare in doing the same analyses:
or
 
Back when I was in grad school (late 1970s, early 1980s) it was emphasized that doing
any serious (high stakes) statistical analysis should be in at least two different statistical
packages and to compare the output for both (I typically used BMDP and SPSS).  This
was a policy followed by some physicists who wanted to make sure that their home grown
programs behaved appropriately even if then used different algorithms for calculations. 
Of more direct relevant to experimental psychologists like myself and social science researchers
was the 1977 American Statistician article by Leland Wilkinson and Gerard Dallal which is
available on www.jstor.org. Here is the citation info along with a stable Jstor URL:
 
  • Accuracy of Sample Moments Calculations among Widely Used Statistical Programs
  • Leland Wilkinson and Gerard E. Dallal
  • The American Statistician, Vol. 31, No. 3 (Aug., 1977), pp. 128-131
    (article consists of 4 pages)
  • Published by: American Statistical Association
  • Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2682964
Wilkinson and Dallal showed how several different mainframe software programs
(i.e., SPSS, BMDP, OSIRIS, and DATATEXT) could produce errorneous results because
the programmers failed to take into account the possibility of underflow or overflow
errors because they had not allocated sufficient space in memory to represent very
small or very large numbers.  Only BMDP, because it used a different algorithm was
able to produce correct results.  I wondered how many people who had used SPSS
or the other programs for their dissertations or published researched actually went
back to their data and re-analyzed it in order to find out whether they had made any
errors.  Subsequent versions corrected these problem but given the complexity of
statistical programs, new problems will inevitably crop up.
 
Wilkinsion and Dallal would go on and develop various statistical testing batteries
to see how accurate the calculations are for the newer statistical packages. B.D.
McCullough has also done the same; see;
 
  • B. D. McCullough
  • The American Statistician, Vol. 52, No. 4 (Nov., 1998), pp. 358-366
  • Published by: American Statistical Association
  • Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2685442
  •  
  • B. D. McCullough
  • The American Statistician, Vol. 53, No. 2 (May, 1999), pp. 149-159
  • Published by: American Statistical Association
  • Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2685736
  •  
     
    McCullough has also evaluated the statistical capabilities of off-the-shelf Excel and
    his recommendation is don't use Excel for any serious statistical analysis. You
    don't have to take his word
     
    It should also be noted that Leland Wilkinson (his webpages is
    http://www.cs.uic.edu/~wilkinson/ ) developed the SYSTAT software
    package.  It might be remembered that SPSS bought SPSS (along with
    a lot of other software packages) but then spun SYSTAT off  (the story
    on this is provided by Wilkinson on his website; see:
     
    So,  SYSTAT is still available as a statistical package (I own a copy of
    version 11) and more information about it can be obtained from the SYSTAT
    website:   www.systat.com
    I would suggest that people take it into consideration as a vaiable alternative
    to SPSS but such a decision would be dependent on how well SYSTAT meets
    you immediate and foreseeable needs.
     
    -Mike Palij
    New York University
     
     
     
     
     
    ----- Original Message -----
    Sent: Friday, September 25, 2009 5:55 AM
    Subject: Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

    Looks fairly intuitive.  Can it really do everything I want?  If so, does this mean I have to ditch 38 years of SPSS?
     
    My tutorials are built round the processing and analysis of actual data from real questionnaire surveys (no artificial data whatsoever) from initial checking of raw data to publishable tables and charts.  I use SPSS because it was there when everyone needed it, was widely available and had a manual which made sense (even though I had to write tutorials to suit the research sequence rather than follow the alphetical sequence of commands). 
     
    I'm too busy doing my SPSS versions, but it would be interesting to see parallel STATA syntax alongside that for SPSS.  More than 30 years ago, Steve Tagg and I thought of producing a Clods' Guide to Survey Analysis with SPSS, but we later also had the idea of a loose-leaf edition with side-by-side examples from other software.  I don't know if anyone has actually produced such a manual, but if anyone wants to try it with any of my tutorials, feel free.
     
    They're all listed on  Survey Analysis Workshop (July 2009) with hyperlinks for free downloads.  By the end of today there'll be even more uploads.
     
    This thread is throwing up some really interesting comments, but I'm not sure the subject is catching everyone who could contribute.  Perhaps something like, "SPSS versus other software"?
    ----- Original Message -----
    Sent: Friday, September 25, 2009 11:00 AM
    Subject: Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?


    I don't get the complete SPSS-synta, but I try my best.
    > recode         V363 (1 3 5 7 =1)(2 4 6 8 =2) into ethnic.
    One possibility:
    recode  V363 (1 3 5 7 =1)(2 4 6 8 =2)
    ren V363 ethnic

    > rename variables (v348 = sex).
    ren V348 sex

    > freq     sex ethnic.
    tab sex ethnic (maybe with some suboptions, depending on what you want
    in each cell)

    In fact, I don't think there's much of a difference between SPSS and
    Stata for these simple commands. The main advantage of the
    Stata-syntax is that it always follows the structure "command
    variables, options" which makes it pretty intuitive. For instance,

    Linear regression
    reg y x

    with robust standard errors
    reg y x, robust

    with bootstrapped SEs (500 reps)
    reg y x, vce(bootstrap, reps(500))

    Logit
    logit y x

    with robust standard errors
    logit y x, robust

    And so on.

    Best,

    Nils
    On Thu, Sep 24, 2009 at 10:58 PM, John F Hall <[hidden email]> wrote:

    > If SPSS syntax is:
    >
    > recode V363 (1 3 5 7 =1)(2 4 6 8 =2) into ethnic.
    > rename variables (v348 = sex).
    > count sexism = V248 V252 V253 V256 V261 (3,4)
    >
    > V251 V255 V259 V260 (1,2).
    >
    > freq sex ethnic.
    > freq sexism /his nor.
    > cros sexism by sex ethnic
    > /sexism by sex by ethnic /cel per.
    > means sexism by sex ethnic
    > /sexism by sex by ethnic.
    >
    > ...what would the syntax be in STATA and would it be as easy to understand?
    >
    >

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    Re: Compute

    Peck, Jon
    In reply to this post by Albert-Jan Roskam
    Prior to the introduction of the Dataset class in V16, you can't modify an existing variable, but you can create a new one by using w mode.  See the accessType='w' implementation in the spssdata.Spssdata class.  That works in V15.

    Regards,
    Jon

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Albert-Jan Roskam [mailto:[hidden email]]
    Sent: Friday, September 25, 2009 3:38 AM
    To: [hidden email]; Peck, Jon
    Subject: Re: [SPSSX-L] Compute

    Hi Jon and others,

    Below is my solution, but it gets quite low-tech at the cursor part. The thing is (using v15), I know how to READ and how to WRITE case data, but not how to do both in one cursor 'session'. Is there an accesstype="rw"? Or is that post-v15 altogether?

    What would be the best, most efficient, most Pythonic way to accomplish this?

    Thank you in advance and enjoy your weekend!

    Albert-Jan

    import spss, spssdata

    # sample data
    spss.Submit(r"""
    data list free / x (f) y (f) z (f).
    begin data
    1 1 1
    1 2 3
    1 1 0
    0 9 5
    end data.
    save outfile = 'd:/temp/tmp0.sav'.
    """)

    # create a "frequency table" for each case
    # Note. Python 2.5 would offer a much juicier solution with collections.defaultdict() ;-)
    def update_freqs(record):
        freqs = {}
        for key in record:
            if key not in freqs:
                freqs.setdefault(key, 1)
            else:
                freqs.update({key: freqs.get(key) + 1})
        maxkey = max(freqs.keys())
        maxval = max(freqs.values())
        return {maxkey: maxval}

    # store the frequency table in a potentially huge dictionary named casenum
    spss.Submit("get file = 'd:/temp/tmp0.sav'.")
    data = spssdata.Spssdata(["x", "y", "z" ])
    casenum = {}
    for lino, record in enumerate(data):
        f = update_freqs(record)
        print f
        casenum.update({lino+1: f})

    data.CClose()

    # warning: a very low-tech solution follows! ;-)
    # apply a potentially huge amount of IF statements
    # nicer would be: read case data with one cursor, then instantly commit case data with another,
    # without building this dictionary.

    for lino, kv in casenum.iteritems():
        spss.Submit(r"""
    do if ( $casenum eq %s ).
    +compute maxkey = %s.
    +compute maxval = %s.
    end if.
    list all.
        """ % (lino, kv.keys()[0], kv.values()[0]))



    --- On Thu, 9/24/09, Peck, Jon <[hidden email]> wrote:

    > From: Peck, Jon <[hidden email]>
    > Subject: Re: [SPSSX-L] Compute
    > To: [hidden email]
    > Date: Thursday, September 24, 2009, 9:05 PM
    > If you mean that you want the
    > within-case mode, there are two functions in the
    > extendedTransforms module that can be used with the SPSSINC
    > TRANS extension command to calculate a casewise mode.
    > They work with V17 or later and the programmability plugin.
    >
    > Here's an example.
    > SPSSINC TRANS RESULT=themode modecount
    > /FORMULA extendedTransforms.mode(x1, x2, ..., x6)
    >
    > That creates TWO variables: themode is a mode, picking
    > arbitrarily if there is a tie, and modecount is the number
    > of modes.
    >
    > The second function is multimode.  It could be used
    > like this:
    > SPSSINC TRANS RESULT=themode1 themode2
    > /FORMULA extendedTransforms.multimode(args=[x1, x2, ...,
    > x6], maxvalues=2).
    >
    > That returns up to two mode values in variables themode1
    > and themode2 (sysmis in themode2 if the mode is unique).
    >
    > multimode also provides control over whether or not to
    > include missing values in the calculation.
    >
    > The plugin and these supplementary modules are available
    > from Developer Central (www.spss.com/devcentral).
    >
    > HTH,
    > Jon Peck
    >
    >
    >
    > -----Original Message-----
    > From: SPSSX(r) Discussion [mailto:[hidden email]]
    > On Behalf Of Albert-Jan Roskam
    > Sent: Thursday, September 24, 2009 12:52 PM
    > To: [hidden email]
    > Subject: Re: [SPSSX-L] Compute
    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > Did you already consider how you deal with ties? For
    > example, value 3 and 4 each occur 3 times. Which is the most
    > repeated value?
    >
    > I would loop over the data and create a Python dictionary
    > 'd' for each case, with values and frequencies as keys and
    > values, respectively. The most often repeated value of a
    > record is then defined as rep_value = d.get(max(d)). But
    > with ties rep_value equals just any one of the ties.
    >
    > Something like that. But I'm not sure how to use one (and
    > only one, because of my Spss version [15 here at home]
    > doesn't allow me to use more) cursor for both reading and
    > writing case data.
    >
    > Cheers!!
    > Albert-Jan
    >
    >
    > --- On Thu, 9/24/09, Kemal Suher <[hidden email]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > From: Kemal Suher <[hidden email]>
    > > Subject: [SPSSX-L] Compute
    > > To: [hidden email]
    > > Date: Thursday, September 24, 2009, 3:43 PM
    > > I want to find the most repeated
    > > value in the row and I want to use Compute
    > > menu. But I can not find the right function. I have
    > six
    > > variables. I want to
    > > create a new variable and I want spss to find and
    > write the
    > > most repated
    > > value for every row from six variables. Compute admits
    > mode
    > > but for only two
    > > variables. If you cam help me I will be very pleased.
    > >
    > > Kemal
    > >
    > > =====================
    > > To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message
    > to
    > > [hidden email]
    > > (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
    > > command. To leave the list, send the command
    > > SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
    > > For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send
    > the
    > > command
    > > INFO REFCARD
    > >
    >
    > =====================
    > To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
    > [hidden email]
    > (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
    > command. To leave the list, send the command
    > SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
    > For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the
    > command
    > INFO REFCARD
    >
    > =====================
    > To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
    > [hidden email]
    > (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
    > command. To leave the list, send the command
    > SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
    > For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the
    > command
    > INFO REFCARD
    >

    =====================
    To manage your subscription to SPSSX-L, send a message to
    [hidden email] (not to SPSSX-L), with no body text except the
    command. To leave the list, send the command
    SIGNOFF SPSSX-L
    For a list of commands to manage subscriptions, send the command
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    Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

    Yves_Therriault
    In reply to this post by Marta Garcia-Granero

    Dear SPSS listers,

    I've been using SPSS for almost 20 years in my work as a research analyst in public health. I've been a SPSS fan since the old days when I was working with SPSS Pc +. I rarely use the GUI and prefer to work with syntax. I learned a lot from this list (many thanks to Ray Levesque, Hector Malletta, and many others).

    Yet, I'm seriously considering to switch to Stata instead of upgrading to the new SPSS 18 release (from my current 12.01 version). I've had the opportunity to test a demo version of Stata (Stata intercooled) earlier this year and I'm very impressed with the software. I'm not a statistician, but it seems to me that Stata is generally superior to SPSS in many ways.

    - First of all, with Stata, we have the "complete" thing. No need to buy rather expensive add-on modules if one needs and wants to do more advanced statistical analysis or has to analyse data from complex samples. Even though Stata has a complete set of features, the IC version is less expensive than the SPSS Base version (sorry, I'm still not used to PASW name).

    - Stata syntax seems to be far more intuitive.

    - Better documentation.

    - Features and procedures very useful in public health (like the standardization of rates, direct or indirect).

    - For what I know, Stata is much more internet aware than SPSS. Updating Stata is really easy as Garry said. There are hundreds and hundreds of user-written routines that can be installed quicky and directly from the internet with a particular Stata command. No need no login to Stata website do so.

    - Stata website has much more useful resources. The information we seek is very easy to find.

    - Licensing policies that allow Stata users to use their license code to install the software on 3 computers (office, home, and personal laptop) provided of course that only one instance of Stata is running at the same time.

    - Stata concentrates its efforts into developing a product in a way I agree with. I never really agreed with the orientation that SPSS has taken in the last years (focusing on "predictive analysis" for big corporations in order to help them to make better decisions).

    - Stata publishes its own quarterly peer-reviewed journal in Statistics. I can't judge the merits of Stata journal nor its quality, but I think its a good indicator that Stata is very "statistically oriented". The journal also publishes notes, columns, comments and tips written by strong Stata users.

    I totally agree with Garry that SPSS output capabilities are far better than Stata's. Stata is currently light years behind SPSS regarding output management. It's the only advantage I see in SPSS over Stata and it's the only reason why I didn't switch to Stata yet.

    Nevertheless, is it time to see goodbye to an old friend ?

    Kind regards,

    Yves Therriault, Ph. D.
    Agent de recherche
    Surveillance de l'état de santé de la population (Santé publique)
    Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de la Côte-Nord
    Baie-Comeau (QC), Canada


    -----Original Message-----

    Date:    Thu, 24 Sep 2009 20:23:04 +0100
    From:    Garry Gelade <[hidden email]>
    Subject: Re: Can we "freeze" at SPSS 15 for several years?

    Bruce

    One of the great advantages of Stata is the ease with which new statistical
    procedures can be added, eg if you want a robust statistics module, or a
    spatial autocorrelation module, you can just download the relevant package
    for free, and install it quickly. You don't have to 'upgrade'. SPSS on the
    other hand comes with a fixed set of procedures. Of course you can add on
    modules - at a price - but even then the range on offer is nowhere near as
    comprehensive as in Stata.

    That said, SPSS is a fantastic product in many ways, and its output
    capabilities are far better than Stata. But instead of spending development
    effort on annual upgrades, which are expensive and time consuming for many
    users, I'd like to see SPSS extending the Python and R side, and building a
    range of downloadable packages.

    Garry Gelade
    Business Analytic Ltd

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